The Rhythm Section (2020)…is not my tempo.

I have to hope that when Barbara Broccoli (who produced “The Rhythm Section” along with brother and long-time producing partner Michael G Wilson) advised that she didn’t want to make the character of Bond a woman because she believes she ‘should be creating new characters for women – strong female characters’, she had something better…

War is hell but 1917 (2020) is heavenly film making

Astonishingly, breathtakingly, technically brilliant, “1917” is a mesmerising, masterful achievement in the art and technique of cinema. But this is no cold, Zemeckis-like exercise in technological advancement and instead uses its relentless focus and visceral real-time storytelling to relay the human tragedy of warfare at its most grandiose and grotesque folly. April 1917: The German…

Good Omens is a nice and accurate adaptation of the book, but not much more.

“Good Omens”, starting on BBC2 tonight after an exclusive first run on Amazon Prime is a nice and accurate translation of a long-thought unfilmable book to the small screen, but that’s about it. Despite note-perfect casting, decent special effects and the presence of Neil Gaiman himself as showrunner, somehow the series ends up less than…

The Limehouse Golem (2017) Review

On the surface, “The Limehouse Golem” seems like just another Victorian murder mystery, a Sherlockian tribute act riffing off the legend of Jack The Ripper but it’s what beneath the surface, behind the façade that drives the narrative and gives it a thematic power which helps it rise above its clichéd although handsomely executed trappings….

Rogue One (2016) Review

A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away a young moisture farmer was planning on wasting time with his friends, picking up some power converters from Tosche Station on Tatooine. But this isn’t his story…at least not yet. “Rogue One” brings us a Star Wars story that’s more prologue than prequel as it…

Victor Frankenstein (2015) Review

If you’re to have any hope at all of enjoying “Victor Frankenstein”, you’ll need to ‘consciously uncouple’ yourself from the source novel. The script takes its inspiration not from Mary Shelley’s text but instead the many, many works derived from it in the years following its publication. The ‘twist’ this time round is the story…